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20121001
20121031
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 125 (some duplicates have been removed)
heating up, and one city's efforts to cool down. >> ifill: and ray suarez has the story of a mexican drug lord killed in a gunfight, and his corpse stolen from the funeral home. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the former football coach who plunged penn state university into scandal by his sexual abuse of young boys over many years was sentenced today. the judge called his crime a "story of betrayal." jerry sandusky wore a red jail jump suit and a smile as he entered the center county courthouse this morning, less than two hours later, the smile was gone after th
people killed, and $20 billion or more in damage. the nation's most populous city and its surroundings were at the epicenter. new york is a city in shock today, even deserted in places after a night of fear, fire and floods. a record storm surge of 13 feet poured into parts of lower manhattan, brooklyn, and queens as sandy hit. the rush of water closed major commuter tunnels linking manhattan with otherboros contributing to the worst damage to the subway system in its 108 years. >> last night we could look down this street here and we saw the river coming toward us and it actually looked like something out of a movie. it was unbelievable. >> woodruff: equally unbelievable, winds of at least 80 miles an hour blew out the bright lights that usually dominate the manhattan skyline. some one million homes and businesses in and around the city lost power. today mayor michael bloomberg appealed for understanding amid warnings it could take days to restore all transit service and power. >> we have begun the work of clearing and reopening bridges and roadways both of which will take some time.
is one of the most swinging cities in the whole country, politically speaking, that is. we'll explain. >> ifill: the supreme court devoted its day to drug-sniffing dogs and privacy rights. we talk with marcia coyle of the national law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without
're smarter than we are here. maybe they are. but not about this. >> ifill: in new york city officials shut down all transit services and ordered nearly 400,000 people to evacuate low-lying areas. hours before sandy hit, high water blew on to the board walk in battery park at the southern tip of manhattan. high winds also left a construction crane dangling from the top of a 55-story building. even the stock market closed due to weather for the first time in nearly 30 years. it will remain closed tomorrow. the nation's capital followed suit, shutting down public transportation, schools, and federal offices. president obama canceled a campaign rally in florida and flew back to washington, appearing early this afternoon to promise federal help. >> i'm extraordinarily grateful for the cooperation of our state and local officials. the conversations that i've had with all the governors indicate that at this point there are no unmet needs. i think everybody is taking this very seriously. we've got... prepositioned all the resources that we need. but right now the key is to make sure that the publi
. tonight's missing issue is europe's debt crisis. >> brown: an ancient and historic city at risk in a modern-day civil war. we look at the destruction in aleppo, syria. >> this is one of the great tragedies. aleppo's an extraordinary cross roads of cultures, religions, all built on a strata of centuries of -- >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a 19th century recording made on tinfoil by thomas edison, digitally converted so we can hear it. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing supp
. in september, 2010, in new york city, the premier and china's economic czar said china keeps its currency low in order to give a trade advantage to its manufacturerrers. manufacturers. we should brand it as a currency manipulator. >> you heard the president say the currency has depreciated? >> i think it is a serious problem to brand them a currency manipulator. a lot of countries intervene to affect the value of their currency. japan has many times, and so has many others. we haven't branded any of them a currency manipulator ever. secondly, the chinese currency is what the market price would be. you see that reflected in china's current account balance. the bottom line is the current account balance is well within the standards that we, ourselves, have advocated, saying if it is within those standards it really is not a big problem. the obama administration has pressured china from the start on currency values. they are now close to the market rate. but the issue is two-fold: one, currency value is not, by any means, the biggest issue in u.s./china trade relations. so it diverts attention f
troops and armored vehicles took up positions around the port of kismayo. the city had been a power center for al-shabab, the group that's fought somalia's internationally backed government for years. al-shabab is allied with al- qaeda, but the militants now have been driven out of all of somalia's major cities. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the men at the top of the presidential tickets hunkered down again today for debate preparation, ahead of the big meeting tomorrow night. but they also managed to break away briefly-- president obama for a visit to the hoover dam, and governor romney out with an aide to buy lunch, a burrito. meanwhile, their running mates made multiple stops in key states. vice president biden told a crowd in charlotte, north carolina that mitt romney would raise taxes on most americans to fund tax cuts for the wealthy. >> how they can justify raising taxes on the middle class has been buried the last four years. how in lord's name can they justify raising their taxes with these tax cuts? look, folks, we've seen this
was mobbed by the media as she left the moscow city court. she vowed to fight for the release of the other two women, whose sentences of two years in prison were upheld. the case has been widely condemned in the u.s. and europe as part of a crackdown on dissent. toyota recalled more than seven million vehicles around the world today for a bad power- window switch that can fill the car with smoke. the action affects more than a dozen models made from 2005 through 2010. there have been more than 200 incidents reported in the u.s., but no crashes or injuries have resulted. toyota has been trying to recover from a series of recalls of some 14 million vehicles in recent years. car owners who have crashed in the last three years may have gotten counterfeit airbags as replacements, without knowing it. the national highway traffic safety administration warned today there's an extreme safety risk. it said at least 250,000 vehicles may have airbags that inflate only partially or not at all. car owners should check a website safercar.gov for more information. two americans have won this year's nobel
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 125 (some duplicates have been removed)

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